Printer Friendly

APPLE ANNOUNCES CROSSROADS 3 EDUCATION GRANTS RECIPIENTS

 APPLE ANNOUNCES CROSSROADS 3 EDUCATION GRANTS RECIPIENTS
 CUPERTINO, Calif., May 15 /PRNewswire/ -- At Capital Area Technical Center in Augusta, Maine, high school students are designing and building solar-powered cars and alternative energy sources for the physics lab. In Louisiana, elementary and high school students from the East Baton Rouge Schools, working in collaboration with college engineering students, are assuming roles as project engineers to conduct experiments in heavy construction design and building techniques.
 These schools, along with 19 other educational institutions around the country, have been selected as recipients of Apple Computer Inc.'s Crossroads 3 Education Grants. Now in its third year, the Crossroads Grants program provides Apple Macintosh technology and funds to support innovative interdisciplinary curriculum development and teacher training.
 During the grant award period, Apple provides approximately $40,000 in computers, printers, modems and other peripheral equipment to schools, organizations and teachers to create exciting and engaging learning environments for students. In addition, recipients receive software grants from Claris Corp. and Microsoft Corp., as well as access to Apple's AppleLink worldwide telecommunications network.
 Grant recipients also receive up to $5,000 for program development and support; are able to communicate and collaborate with past grant recipients across the country; and obtain access to Apple's Education Grants Advisory Board.
 According to Andrea Gooden, program manager for Apple's Community Affairs department, the goal of the Crossroads Grants initiative is to encourage the integration of technology into classroom studies. "Our mission is to provide teachers with the technology they need to develop new learning experiences for students," said Gooden, "and help them use these tools in ways that foster community involvement."
 Based on their proposals to Apple, Crossroads 3 Grants recipients will develop curricula that involve some or all of the following methods:
 -- Collaborative teaching that combines the expertise and experience of two or more teachers in different subjects, in the same school, or even in separate schools;
 -- Community involvement that takes learning beyond the four walls of the classroom and involves students in local civic, cultural, or social service organizations;
 -- Collaborative learning that incorporates into a group effort the individual contributions of students with different abilities and from diverse backgrounds;
 -- Intergenerational learning between students and older people who can share life experiences and broaden the students' perspectives;
 -- Distance learning using telecommunications to open students to a world of information and personal contacts.
 Gooden noted that since its inception in 1979, Apple's Education Grants program has donated more than $20 million of computer technology and software to more than 500 schools and organizations across the country. Many previous Apple Education Grants recipients have received national recognition for their innovative work with Apple technology. Among them are Paul Reese, who won the 1990 Electronic Learning "Educator of the Year" award for his work with students in Harlem; and Tina Petrone, who was named a Christa McAuliffe Fellow by the governor of Pennsylvania in 1991.
 All Crossroads Grants recipients receive equipment configurations valued at approximately $40,000. The standard configuration includes eight Macintosh LC computer systems; one Apple LaserWriter and two Apple ImageWriter printers; one Apple 150 CD-ROM player and an Apple OneScanner imaging device; and a variety of educational software packages from Claris Corp. and Microsoft Corp.
 Winners of this year's Crossroads 3 Education Grants are:
 (Listed alphabetically by state) California
 Kern County Schools
 Bakersfield, Calif.
 Collaborator: California State University, Bakersfield
 Pre-K through grade 12 students with severe multiple handicaps and no formal communication system will develop their own vocabularies by shaping natural body language into a meaningful system of expressive language. Apple technology will be used to support authoring animation, interactive video, and graphic software. Cal State University will field test resulting products.
 Edenvale Elementary School
 San Jose, Calif.
 K-6 grade students, many of whom have limited English skills, will integrate language arts and social studies to gain an awareness of immigrant contributions to local and U.S. history. Students will research, write and publish a book, produce a video documentary, and write an interactive program for classroom and district-wide use to supplement the district curriculum and the California History and Social Studies Framework.
 Grizzly Hill School
 North San Juan, Calif.
 Collaborator: Sierran Biodiversity Institute and Yuba Watershed Institute (YWI)
 Seventh and eighth grade students will incorporate science, social studies, math, language arts and computer science in an environmental studies program called "Earth Views." Students will use simulation software, satellite imagery, and "ground truthing" to gain environmental and scientific understanding. YWI will assist with ground truthing of digital maps.
 Sierran Biodiversity Institute will share technical resources and assist with research, planning and evaluation.
 Pala Middle School
 San Jose, Calif.
 Seventh and eighth grade students in the Alum Rock School District of San Jose will integrate mathematics and science utilizing robotics and laser technology. Students will create their own machines and robots using Macintosh technology.
 Hoover High School
 San Diego
 Collaborator: San Diego State University
 Ninth grade students use their community as a "laboratory for learning," constructing oral, written, and visual histories of San Diego and its people. Colorado
 Teller Elementary
 Force Elementary School
 Denver
 Third through sixth grade students at these schools create "mini- societies" that integrate economics, law, math, language and art. Students will develop their own governments and economic systems. Database, spreadsheet, writing and publishing software will be used extensively. Teller school will produce its communication tools in both English and Spanish. District of Columbia
 D.C. Public Schools -- Language Minority Affairs Branch
 Tubman and Bancroft Elementary Schools
 Washington
 Collaborator: The National Zoo - Smithsonian Institution and D.C. Public Schools
 "Who Lives and Works at the Zoo?" is a joint project between students at two D.C. public elementary schools and the National Zoo -- located within walking distance from the two schools. The thematic curriculum provides an interdisciplinary experience in science, language arts, fine arts, and communications. Third through sixth grade students teams will produce HyperCard stacks and multimedia presentations. Student work will be exhibited at the Zoo using a Macintosh interactive multimedia platform. Florida
 Dream Lake Elementary School
 Apopka, Fla.
 Collaborator: Central Florida Astronomical Society
 In collaboration with the Central Florida Astronomical Society, fourth and fifth grade students will develop skills in reading, writing, and scientific principles. They will study light, optics and stars, using Macintosh computers to collect graphic data about local lighting conditions and light pollution. Students will produce illustrations and designs for improved lighting, as well as produce star views for use in astronomy education. Graphics programs will be used to design and alter images and a database will track costs of operating lights.
 Sidney Lanier School; Metcalfe Elementary
 Gainsville, Fla.
 Collaborator: University of Florida
 Special Education curriculum and use of technology will enable students with physical disabilities to do things they would not ordinarily be able to do using traditional learning tools. The curriculum will focus on functional skills, language, math, science and social studies.
 Florida Memorial College - Aviation Studies
 and Hialeah High School
 Miami
 Macintosh technology integrated into the "Airway Science" program will enable tenth grade students to design aviation-oriented multimedia applications that will increase knowledge of algebra and physics. Eleventh and twelfth grade students will become curriculum developers. Illinois
 Kenwood Academy
 Chicago
 Collaborator: Illinois Institute of Technology
 Tenth through twelfth grade students will use computer imaging technologies to learn about concepts like atomic structure and orbital configuration. Students will be able to learn complex scientific principles using the computer as a "lab partner" while conducting experiments. Illinois Institute of Technology will support the program with teacher training. Kentucky
 Woodbridge Academy
 Lexington, Ky.
 K-12 grade students at this school have attention deficity disorders, learning disabilities, and dyslexia. The goals of this program are to develop and enhance reading, writing, mathematical, problem solving and communication skills. A major problem in the area is "sink-hole" pollution. Students will form SINK teams, conduct research, visit community government agencies, analyze water runoff samples, etc. Technology will enable students to access, organize, and share information; design and prepare reports; analyze data; and model environmental processes and effects. Louisiana
 East Baton Rouge Schools
 Goodwood Elementary School and Istrouma High & Tech School
 Baton Rouge, La.
 Collaborators: Exxon, College of Education at LSU; Louisiana Engineering Society
 "Bridging the Gap" is a collaborative effort between pre- engineering college students, elementary and high school students, and the local engineering community. Students assume roles as project engineers; use computers to conduct experiments; create constructions; and develop multimedia presentations. Maine
 Capital Area Technical Center
 Cony High School
 Augusta, Maine
 High school students will research, design, and build real life energy projects -- from solar powered cars to alternative energy sources for the physics lab. Drafting, electricity, and carpentry students will help design and teach the course. Central Maine Power engineers will act as advisors. Minnesota
 Chief Bug-O-Nay-Ge-Shig
 Cass Lake, Minn.
 Native American Ojibwe students will develop bilingual multimedia courseware using CD-ROM players and laserdiscs. They will also utilize graphics and text in developing trading cards that depict Ojibwe people, places and things. Nebraska
 Maxwell Public School
 Maxwell, Neb.
 In this farming and ranching community, middle and high school students will learn all aspects of farming as a business operation. Local farmers, ranchers and businessmen will be involved. Students will determine field layouts, size plotting, accounting for fence lines, farmsteads, trees, water, etc. They'll make use of database/spreadsheets, desktop publishing and computer-aided design software programs. New York
 Junior High School 47 School for the Deaf
 New York
 Hearing impaired students are involved in "Fingerprints Press" -- a program that encourages creativity, independence and practical skills in
vocational/entrepreneurship program. Macintosh computers are used for graphic design, research, accounting, word processing and scheduling. Oregon
 Monroe Middle School
 Eugene, Ore.
 Eighth-graders will participate in the "Monroe Flight Academy", an interdisciplinary course that integrates physical science, math, history, geography and communications. This program involves partnerships with the local airport, library, historical society, and flight museum. South Dakota
 Lower Brule School
 Lower Brule, S.D.
 Students will focus on economic development and community problem- solving within the reservation, studying its impact on tribal government. Technology will enable students to access online databases; communicate online; and develop presentations using HyperCard and desktop publishing. Washington
 Glover Middle School
 Spokane, Wash.
 Working under a theme of "Life Cycle," seventh and eighth grade students will integrate Science, Social Studies and Language Arts into a curriculum in which students are scientists, researchers and publishers. Student teams will work with technical advisors from the U.S. Department of Interior, Washington Water & Power, Cox Cable, Eastern Washington University and social services agencies.
 -0- 5/15/92
 NOTE: Apple, the Apple logo, Macintosh, LaserWriter, ImageWriter, HyperCard and AppleLink are registered trademarks of Apple Computer Inc. OneScanner is a trademark of Apple Computer Inc.
 /CONTACT: Bill Keegan of Apple Computer, 408-974-5460/
 (AAPL) CO: Apple Computer Inc. ST: California IN: CPR SU:


DG -- SJ002 -- 0569 05/15/92 08:16 EDT
COPYRIGHT 1992 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:May 15, 1992
Words:1801
Previous Article:PATLEX, AUTOFINANCE GROUP ANNOUNCE MERGER AGREEMENT IN PRINCIPLE
Next Article:DR. THOMAS H. ADAMS ELECTED TO LA JOLLA PHARMACEUTICAL BOARD
Topics:


Related Articles
ENVIRONMENTAL SUPPORT CENTER AND APPLE AWARD COMPUTERS TO 100 ENVIRONMENTAL GROUPS
APPLE ANNOUNCES EARTHGRANTS AWARDS
APPLE ANNOUNCES 1993 EDUCATION LEADERSHIP GRANT RECIPIENTS
APPLE EXPANDS EDUCATION PRODUCT LINE AND MARKETING PROGRAMS AT NECC '93
DIGITAL DONATES $2.1 MILLION TO 30 UNIVERSITIES NATIONWIDE
APPLE ANNOUNCES 1994 'PARTNERS IN EDUCATION GRANT' RECIPIENTS
APPLE ANNOUNCES 1995 'PARTNERS IN EDUCATION' GRANT RECIPIENTS
APPLE PRESENTS INNOVATIVE SCHOLAR AWARD TO CHILEAN EDUCATION PROJECT
APPLE ANNOUNCES 1996 RECIPIENTS FOR 'PARTNERS IN EDUCATION' GRANTS
Apple Kicks Off Computer Learning Month By Donating an iMac a Day.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters