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AMERICANS OPTIMISTIC AT BEGINNING OF 1992

 AMERICANS OPTIMISTIC AT BEGINNING OF 1992
 OWINGS MILLS, Md., Jan. 9 /PRNewswire/ -- In a poll conducted for


the annual national television special, "Louis Rukeyser's 1992 Money Guide," the Opinion Research Corporation, of Princeton, N.J., found that while 64 percent of those asked felt that 1991 wasn't a good year for America, 57 percent thought that 1992 would be a better one.
 "Louis Rukeyser's 1992 Money Guide" will be seen at 9 p.m. EST this Friday, Jan. 10 on most PBS stations (check local listings for time in your area).
 The poll of 1,002 Americans, conducted Jan. 2-5, with a 3 percent margin of error, found that despite much denigration of the 1980s, 59 percent felt that the decade was a good one for the country. But 65 percent feel the condition of the national economy is poor today. Roughly similar percentages feel that 1991 was a good year for themselves, but a bad year for the United States as a whole. Seventy-one percent think 1992 will be a better year for themselves.
 President Bush was elected with about 54 percent of the vote in 1988, and today, 54 percent of those polled think he's doing a good job. Sixty-seven percent think he's doing a poor job at managing the economy, while 68 percent think he's doing a good job at managing foreign policy.
 Bush was favored for renomination by 61 percent of those asked, while just 12 percent supported the Republican challenge by commentator Patrick Buchanan and 3 percent supported David Duke.
 The favorite Democrat was "don't know," with 48 percent, followed by New York Gov. Mario Cuomo, who has decided not to seek the nomination, with 19 percent. Of the 6 declared candidates, former California Gov. Jerry Brown leads with just 9 percent.
 As of now, President Bush would easily win reelection, the poll finds, beating Cuomo 56-29 percent, Brown 61-21 percent, Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton 59-19 percent, Iowa Sen. Tom Harkin 60-18 percent, Nebraska Sen. Bob Kerrey 58-20 percent, Virginia Gov. Douglas Wilder 59-18 percent and former Massachusetts Sen. Paul Tsongas, 62-17 percent.
 Thirty-eight percent favor Dan Quayle's retention as Bush's running mate this year. Forty-nine percent prefer someone else. When given a list of 10 issues to choose from, 24 percent chose unemployment as the issue that concerned them most. Nineteen percent named health care costs, 10 percent each AIDS and the homeless, 9 percent each crime and drugs, 8 percent inflation, 7 percent taxes, 1 percent race relations, and less than 1 percent sexual harassment.
 Three-quarters are optimistic about the future of America, while fully 79 percent feel that future should include a limit on terms of members of Congress to no more than 12 years. But 61 percent thought that their congressman was doing a good job.
 Seventy-one percent feel that Americans are greedier today than they were in the 1970s, while 64 percent feel that they personally are not greedier.
 Relations between the races and the sexes have been contentious topics in America recently. Thirty-nine percent think the race relations in the United States are better than they were a decade ago, 39 percent say they're about the same, 21 percent say they're worse.
 That sexual harassment in America is more common than generally believed is the feeling of 47 percent of Americans polled, while 35 percent think it's an occasional problem that has been overblown by the media. Eleven percent think it's extremely common, and 5 percent think it's rarely or never a problem.
 Thirty-four percent think the stock market will be higher in a year while 31 percent think it will be about the same. Twenty-four percent of those polled said they expected to buy bonds, and 21 percent said they expected to buy mutual funds. Thirteen percent said they expected to buy a house.
 Guests on Rukeyser's one-hour special will include Sen. Lloyd Bentsen (D-Texas); Rep. Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.); noted economists Arthur Laffer and Robert Reich; USA Today founder and chairman of the Freedom Forum, Al Neuharth; Charles Clough, chief investment strategist for Merrill Lynch; money managers Foster Friess and Christian Wignall; mutual fund advisor Don Phillips and financial planner Alexandra Armstrong.
 -0- 1/9/92
 /CONTACT: Maureen L. Volland of Maryland Public Television, 410-581-4334/ CO: Maryland Public Television ST: Maryland IN: SU: ECO


SB-MK -- DC045 -- 8398 01/09/92 16:39 EST
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Date:Jan 9, 1992
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