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AFS President's message.

I am very excited about the progress that has been made since merger talks between AFS and ACMA first began. As you may recall, action on unification of the American Foundrymen's Society and the American Cast Metals Association was initiated in April 1989 when the ACMA board directed its Chairman, James Pearson, to contact the AFS to explore the feasibility of combining the strengths of the two organizations. The first meeting was held July 15, 1989. After many meetings, all of the issues were finally resolved, and both memberships approved the merger, which became effective December 31, 1990. The potential clout of the combined organizations could now be realized.

The phasing together of the two organizations has gone much smoother than anyone had imagined. Chuck Jones has done a super job in consolidating the staff specialists of both organizations into one unified organization and eliminating some obvious duplication of efforts.

While it has been less than a year since the merger was completed, we are already seeing many of the benefits. As the traditional technical and educational services provided to the AFS membership continue to expand, the new membership services, human resources, marketing, management and government affairs are rapidly being integrated into a unified program of services.

To ensure that these programs continue to be emphasized and improved, I have appointed an ad hoc committee headed by past AFS director, Tom Woehike, to organize an AFS Management Council. This organization is expected to be similar in structure to the current AFS Technical Council but will concentrate on the non-technical services provided by AFS.

Despite all of the promise this new organization holds, the full benefits of the merger will not be realized without full AFS membership participation, especially in the area of government affairs. This is one area where the clout of the new AFS will certainly be beneficial if we will all get involved in the local, state and federal legislative process. With a full-time Washington office, AFS now has programs and services that will increase members' effectiveness in the legislative area.

There are also several other programs underway that will further enhance our efforts at all levels of government and will improve service to AFS members. For example, a meeting of the chairmen of the various state foundry organizations has already been held to address the questions of how the new AFS can better support the state foundry organizations and further unify our work at the state and local levels.

There will also be a Foundry Executive Management Conference in early October in Williamsburg, Virginia. This will be a great opportunity for managers at all levels to meet to discuss mutual problems and opportunities facing the foundry industry in the 1990s.

As I said earlier, we have just begun to see the benefits of the new AFS, and I am excited about what I see. However, for us to reach our full potential, we need the involvement of all AFS members and the entire foundry industry.

if we don't succeed, we can blame no one but ourselves.

I am very excited about the progress that has been made since merger talks between AFS and ACMA first began. As you may recall, action on unification of the American Foundrymen's Society and the American Cast Metals Association was initiated in April 1989 when the ACMA board directed its Chairman, James Pearson, to contact the AFS to explore the feasibility of combining the strengths of the two organizations. The first meeting was held July 15, 1989. After many meetings, all of the issues were finally resolved, and both memberships approved the merger, which became effective December 31, 1990. The potential clout of the combined organizations could now be realized.

The phasing together of the two organizations has gone much smoother than anyone had imagined. Chuck Jones has done a super job in consolidating the staff specialists of both organizations into one unified organization and eliminating some obvious duplication of efforts.

While it has been less than a year since the merger was completed, we are already seeing many of the benefits. As the traditional technical and educational services provided to the AFS membership continue to expand, the new membership services, human resources, marketing, management and government affairs are rapidly being integrated into a unified program of services.

To ensure that these programs continue to be emphasized and improved, I have appointed an ad hoc committee headed by past AFS director, Tom Woehike, to organize an AFS Management Council. This organization is expected to be similar in structure to the current AFS Technical Council but will concentrate on the non-technical services provided by AFS.

Despite all of the promise this new organization holds, the full benefits of the merger will not be realized without full AFS membership participation, especially in the area of government affairs. This is one area where the clout of the new AFS will certainly be beneficial if we will all get involved in the local, state and federal legislative process. With a full-time Washington office, AFS now has programs and services that will increase members' effectiveness in the legislative area.

There are also several other programs underway that will further enhance our efforts at all levels of government and will improve service to AFS members. For example, a meeting of the chairmen of the various state foundry organizations has already been held to address the questions of how the new AFS can better support the state foundry organizations and further unify our work at the state and local levels.

There will also be a Foundry Executive Management Conference in early October in Williamsburg, Virginia. This will be a great opportunity for managers at all levels to meet to discuss mutual problems and opportunities facing the foundry industry in the 1990s.

As I said earlier, we have just begun to see the benefits of the new AFS, and I am excited about what I see. However, for us to reach our full potential, we need the involvement of all AFS members and the entire foundry industry.

if we don't succeed, we can blame no one but ourselves. years ago was our effort to improve and concentrate our strengthened industry research. A strategic research plan to assist and improve the competitiveness of the foundry industry has begun. The basis of the plan is rooted in the 78 technical committees of the Society, representing a cross-section of North American foundries, suppliers and casting users. Environmental issues and concerns brought about by recent legislation and regulations place research in these areas as the number one need for economical technology development.

The development of techniques for producing and delivering consistently clean metal to the casting cavity has also been identified as one of the key objectives for maintaining a competitive edge over foreign competitors and for opening new markets for casting applications. Yield optimization, energy efficiency, dimensional control and quality improvement are among the other areas being addressed by AFS research. Today, AFS research projects that are now in the planning stages represent a commitment through 1993 of over $8 million in funding.

Probably the most significant statement made in 1986 was that we would strive to improve the liaison between other industry groups and related organizations. On November 12, 1990, the members of AFS, a technical, educational and research-oriented organization founded in 1896, ratified a merger of a national trade association and AFS. One of the major benefits-of this was the development of a unified industry voice on governmental and legislative matters. It is fitting that AFS is the surviving corporation due to its many strengths over the years such as being leaders of change and having the ability to change; the diversification of its members; a strong chapter organization; its committee structure; its continuing education program; and the overwhelming support of the industry.

Our mission statement now reads that AFS 'as the leading metalcasting association of North America, shall provide leadership in government relations and also provide the membership with education and information on technology, marketing, management, human resources and research."

The goals of the organization are to assist member companies and individuals to:

* effectively and efficiently manage all production operations,

* profitably market their products and services,

* equitably manage all their employees,

* promote the interests of the foundry industry before legislative and executive branches of the federal government,

* engage in any and all activities that will enhance the economic progress of the metalcasting industry.

This special report was developed to bring you up to date on all of the programs and services of the "New" AFS. Please take a few minutes to review how your Society is changing to meet your needs.

We believe the "New" AFS has much to offer the industry. We on staff look forward to the many new challenges.
COPYRIGHT 1991 American Foundry Society, Inc.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1991, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

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Title Annotation:American Foundrymen's Society
Author:Warren, R. Conner
Publication:Modern Casting
Date:Sep 1, 1991
Words:1462
Previous Article:Reclaimer offers variety of features, throughputs.
Next Article:AFS Services: CMI/Education.
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