Printer Friendly

A standard for key-escrow encryption.

Charged with the responsibility for setting the rules needed to protect the security and privacy of unclassified information in federal computer systems, the National Institute of Standards and Technology last month announced its proposed voluntary standard for key-escrow encryption. The standard specifies using the SKIPJACK encryption algorithm and a method for creating a "Law Enforcement Access Field" (LEAF) -- a mechanism by which authorized government agencies can decipher lawfully intercepted encrypted telecommunications.

Both the algorithm and the LEAF method will be incorporated in an integrated-circuit chip and used in encryption devices attached to telephones. To take advantage of the scheme's LEAF capability, government officials legally authorized to conduct a wiretap would need to obtain key components held by two separate escrow agents.
COPYRIGHT 1993 Science Service, Inc.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1993, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:National Institutes of Standards and Technology proposes voluntary standard
Publication:Science News
Article Type:Brief Article
Date:Aug 28, 1993
Words:121
Previous Article:High marks for encryption algorithm.
Next Article:'Whole language' approach gets a critical read.
Topics:


Related Articles
High marks for encryption algorithm.
Know the code: making encryption safe, legal - and not rare.
Triple DES Is Now A Federal Standard.
Rendering Unto CESA?
COMMERCE DEPARTMENT ANNOUNCES WINNER OF GLOBAL INFORMATION SECURITY COMPETITION.
NIST SPONSORS MODES OF OPERATION WORKSHOP.
NIST announces approval of Advanced Encryption Standard. (News Briefs).
NIST reports measurable success of Advanced Encryption Standard. (News Briefs).
Realising AES-advanced encryption standard. (Security).
Preparing for encryption: new threats, legal requirements boost need for encrypted data.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters