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A LITTLE SHOE POLISH GOES A LONG WAY

 A LITTLE SHOE POLISH GOES A LONG WAY
 DOUGLASSVILLE, Pa., April 22 /PRNewswire/ -- With consumer


confidence in the economy at a 17-year low, times may be hard, but the creativity of the American people is still high.
 A case in point involves consumers finding new ways to save with alternative uses of inexpensive household products.
 As a result, more customers are writing to Kiwi Brands describing the creative ways they use shoe polish.
 What's their message? Before they spend extra money on a specialty product, they're using something they already have in the house.
 Here are the 10 most popular suggestions from the past year:
 -- Polishing horses' hooves -- Devoted equestrians say it helps show horses show off.
 -- Retouching wood furniture -- A little shoe polish can save the cost of a complete refinishing.
 -- Staining hardwood floors -- There's no easier, quicker way to touch-up scratches. This is another use that can help avoid a major refinishing project.
 -- Staining wood carvings -- Artists and sculptors discovered this inexpensive favorite for adding delicate shading to all types of carvings.
 -- Whitening whitewall tires -- Keeping whitewall tires white is difficult, unless you have some white shoe polish available.
 -- Blackening car tires or bumpers -- A quick, inexpensive fix for the tire and bumper "scrapes and dings" all cars suffer.
 -- Retouching vinyl car roofs -- Another way to avoid a complete refinishing job. Is shoe polish a car's best friend?
 -- Selling a car -- Of course, if you're fed up with your car, you can write "SALE" on the windshield in white shoe polish. It won't wash off in the rain, and it's easily removable with window cleaner.
 -- Polishing gun metal -- This is just one of many unusual metal polishing ideas. A black paste polish restores the color, and the waxes protect the metal from rust.
 -- Retouching leather accessories -- In addition to shoes, a wide variety of apparel items can also be spruced up with a little polish and buffing -- belts, handbags, leather coats, etc.
 Of course, creativity with shoe polish isn't limited to recessionary times.
 Last month, Kiwi Brands received a letter from George W. Askew Jr. of Hampton, Va., detailing how he applied Kiwi shoe polish to his P-47 Thunderbolt fighter during World War II. Askew said he found that a polished aircraft was faster at the same power setting than an unpolished aircraft.
 While the polish didn't make his plane bulletproof, it did make it easier to keep it clean.
 /delval/
 -0- 4/22/92
 /CONTACT: John Shiffert of Shaeffer & Associates, 215-546-1660, for Kiwi Brands/ CO: Kiwi Brands ST: Pennsylvania IN: SU:


MK-LJ -- PHFNS1 -- 1006 04/22/92 07:31 EDT
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Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Apr 22, 1992
Words:433
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