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TONIGHT I Love 1977 BBC Two For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 2. For the defunct Philippine network, see Banahaw Broadcasting Corporation.
BBC Two is the second major terrestrial television channel of the BBC.
 Wales, 9.45pm Be prepared for a double dose of nostalgia tonight. Not only does this series celebrate the kitsch crazes of the 1970s, it may also make some viewers misty-eyed for the crazy, far-away days of 2000, when the 'I Love... ' series was first shown.

Hey, remember when that show was so popular, some bright spark at the BBC BBC
 in full British Broadcasting Corp.

Publicly financed broadcasting system in Britain. A private company at its founding in 1922, it was replaced by a public corporation under royal charter in 1927.
 thought it was a good idea to broadcast I Love 1999 in 2001? Anyway, it's 1977 that will be under the microscope, and our guide is Carrie Fisher Carrie Frances Fisher (born October 21, 1956) is an American actress, screenwriter and novelist. She is most famous for her portrayal of Princess Leia Organa in the original Star Wars trilogy, although her comedic novels also have won praise. .

Prior to that year, she was probably best known for being the offspring off America's one-time sweethearts, Eddie Fisher Eddie Fisher may refer to:
  • Eddie Fisher (baseball)
  • Eddie Fisher (singer)
 and Debbie Reynolds, but all that changed in 1977, when she plaited plait  
n.
1. A braid, especially of hair.

2. A pleat.

tr.v. plait·ed, plait·ing, plaits
1. To braid.

2. To pleat.

3. To make by braiding.
 her hair over her ears and took on the role of Princess Leia in the sci-fi blockbuster Star Wars.

That wasn't the only movie making a splash - cinema audiences were also treated to the iconic sight of John Travolta strutting down the street to the strains of the Bee Gees in Saturday Night Fever. Meanwhile, kids that weren't queuing up to watch light-sabre battles were busy skateboarding or stuffing their faces with Space Dust - see, even the sweets had a sci-fi flavour.

TOMORROW Planet Earth Live BBC One, 7.50pm Normally when you hear phrases like "the most ambitious live wildlife series ever undertaken" being bandied about by the BBC, you expect the name David Attenborough to crop up as well. So, it may come as a surprise to find that Planet Earth Live is actually being helmed by Richard Hammond and Julia Bradbury, pictured - with a little help from some of the expert cameramen and women from the Beeb's Natural History Unit.

Together, they'll be spending May tracking the progress of young animals across the world. They couldn't have picked a better month to launch the programme - whether it's grey whales in the Pacific or the meerkats in South Africa, this is a critical stage in the life of many animal youngsters, and we should expect some dramatic developments.

BANK HOLIDAY MONDAY Britain Beware ITV (1) See interactive TV.

(2) (iTV) The code name for Apple's video media hub (see Apple TV).
1 Wales, 10.15pm The title of this documentary makes it sound as if it's another in a long line of consumer programmes, perhaps aiming to warn us of the dangers of some scam or other. However, it's rather more fun than that.

Adrian Edmondson steers us through some of the most memorable work backed by the Central Office of Information (COI), which for 65 years produced public information films that warned us of all sorts of horrors, including travelling in a car without a seatbelt.

"For over half a century, the Central Office of Information made films alerting us to the dangers of the world," says Ade.

"But the images they used had to avoid being overly shocking while at the same time driving home some potentially terrifying messages."

He's right about that - those of us who grew up in the 1970s and 1980s were regularly scared stiff by some of the images seen on screen. If you can stand to see them again, many of the most memorable clips will be broadcast here.

Expect to see the likes of Kevin Keegan, Donald Pleasance, Michael Aspel, Alvin Stardust and Ronnie Barker offering advice, as well as familiar characters such as Tufty tuft  
n.
1. A short cluster of elongated strands, as of yarn, hair, or grass, attached at the base or growing close together.

2. A dense clump, especially of trees or bushes.

v.
 the Squirrel and Joe and Petunia petunia, any plant of the genus Petunia, South American herbs of the family Solanaceae (nightshade family). The common garden petunias, planted also in window boxes, are all considered hybrids of white-flowered and violet-flowered species from Argentina. , the calamitous ca·lam·i·tous  
adj.
Causing or involving calamity; disastrous.



ca·lami·tous·ly adv.
 tourists.

TUESDAY Great Ormond Street BBC Two, 9pm Make no mistake about it, we're a nation of voyeurs, and thanks to the likes of Holby City, Casualty and ER, getting our weekly fix and peering into the goings-on of various fictional hospital wards has become the norm.

But here is something entirely different; different because although the set and uniformed workers are at times reminiscent of our favourite dramas, this is real-life - and put simply, you'll not find children more inspirational than those included in this documentary which observes the treatment of little ones with cancer.

Over the course of a year, cameras have followed the medics at the helm of challenging ethical decisions concerning their patients.

We will be party to some crucial choices faced by doctors as they attempt to determine the best course of action for the young patients in their care, as well as deal with their immediate families.

Great Ormond Street hasn't earned its status and respect as one of the country's leading children's hospitals for nothing - these doctors are some of the best in the business - and with that they find themselves coming face to face with some of the most agonising decisions of their life on a daily basis.

WEDNESDAY Edward VIII: The Plot To Topple A King Channel 4, 9pm Anybody with even a passing interest or knowledge in 20th-century history will know all about Edward VIII. He was dubbed the 'playboy prince' before succeeding his father, George V, to the throne in 1936.

But how many of us have heard of Cosmo Gordon Lang, who played a pivotal role in Edward VIII's decision to abdicate later that same year? We're guessing ver y few, but it's an amazing stor y, as this documentar y reveals. Lang was a surprise choice to become Archbishop of Canterbury in 1928, but many felt he was needed to breathe new life into the Church of England Church of England: see England, Church of.  at a time of crisis and decline.

He was regarded as dedicated to helping the poor, but on gaining his position, used it to curry favour with the monarch, believing he could use his supposed friendship with George V to re-establish religion at the heart of English society.

However, Edward's ascension looked set to ruin Lang's plans - the new king was rumoured to be an atheist who wanted to modernise the royal family, not least by marrying a twice-divorced woman.

So Lang launched his own plot to undermine Edward - although it came at a great professional cost. The story is told here via previously unpublished diaries and personal notes - and rather fascinating it all is too.
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Title Annotation:Features
Publication:Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales)
Date:May 5, 2012
Words:997
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