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1992 American Forests Awards.

DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARD

GIVEN FOR DISTINGUISHED PROFESSIONAL SERVICE IN FORESTRY AND OTHER ASPECTS OF RESOURCE CONSERVATION.

SIDNEY R. YATES

Sid Yates, a member of Congress from the Ninth Congressional District of Illinois, is presently serving his 21st term. He chairs the Interior Subcommittee of the Appropriations Committee, where he oversees the budgets of the Forest Service in addition to those of the Interior Department. He has long been a strong supporter of urban and community forestry programs.

WILLIAM B. GREELEY AWARD

GIVEN ANNUALLY T0 SOMEONE WHO HAS MADE MAJOR CONTRIBUTIONS TO FOREST CONSERVATION IN THE AREA OR REGION IN WHICH HE OR SHE LIVES AND WORKS.

MARY H. SIZEMORE

Mary is a native of Tallassee, Alabama, where she and her husband Bill have resided since 1949. She received her Juris Doctor degree from the University of Alabama. Her goal of serving as a juvenile court judge was sidetracked when she became immersed in timbersale contracts, land-line disputes, and later timber-tax law and environmental aspects of growing timber with Sizemore and Sizemore, Inc. She has authored articles in the Journal of Forestry and the Natural Resources Law Journal and has presented numerous papers at forestry meetings. She served two terms as a director of AMERICAN FORESTS.

WILLIAM R. SIZEMORE

Bill is chairman of Sizemore & Sizemore, Inc., a consulting forestry firm that he founded in 1949. The firm specializes in forest analysis, appraisal, and management. He is a fellow in the Society of American Foresters and was elected to the Alabama Foresters Hall of Fame. He is an emeritus member and chairman of the Board of Visitors of the Duke School of the Environment. Presently he is adjunct professor of forestry at Duke University and Mississippi State University. He has been a member of AMERICAN FORESTS for most of his career.

JOHN ASTON WARDER MEDAL

NAMED FOR THE FOUNDER OF AMERICAN FORESTS, THIS MEDAL IS PRESENTED EACH YEAR TO A MEMBER FOR LONG-TERM ACCOMPLISHMENTS THE CONSERVATION OF FOREST RESOURCES AND THE ENVIRONMENT WITH SPECIAL CONSIDERATION FOR SERVICE TO AMERICAN FORESTS.

THOMAS H. RIPLEY

Tom Ripley has held numerous research and administrative positions in forestry, wildlife biology, range, watershed, and recreation management with universities, state agencies, and the U.S. Forest Service. In the last-named agency he served 11 years, rising to position of chief of range and wildlife research. He joined the Tennessee Valley Authority in 1970 as director of the Division of Forestry, Fisheries and Wildlife Development. He was elected president of the American Forestry Association (now AMERICAN FORESTS) in 1981 and reelected in 1982. In 1983 he was named assistant commissioner and, later, deputy commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Conservation. He retired in 1990.

PRESIDENT'S AWARD

GIVEN AT THE DISCRETION OF THE PRESIDENT OF AMERICAN FORESTS TO INDIVIDUALS OR ORGANIZATIONS WHOSE PARTICIPATION IN AND SUPPORT OF OUR ACTIVITIES HAS BEEN EXEMPLARY.

HYDE H. MURRAY

Hyde Murray is assistant director for national affairs for the American Farm Bureau Federation. He served on the staff of the U.S. House of Representatives for 30 years. For 20 years he was counsel and minority staff director of the House Committee on Agriculture. Since 1990 he has been a member of the AMERICAN FORESTS board, where his contributions have been significant, particularly in the areas of revisions to the bylaws, and in the governance of legal matters.

URBAN FORESTRY MEDALS

ESTABLISHED IN 1982 TO RECOGNIZE OUTSTANDING LEADERSHIP AND SERVICE IN THE ADVANCEMENT OF URBAN FORESTRY CONCEPTS. THREE MEDALS ARE GIVEN EACH YEAR--ONE TO A CITIZEN ACTIVIST, ONE TO AN URBAN FOREST PROFESSIONAL, AND ONE TO AN EDUCATOR OR RESEARCHER.

CITIZEN MEDAL

DONA S. CHAMBERS

As executive director of Trees for Houston, Dona Chambers has spearheaded a citizen movement that has had nationwide influence. She led the way in organizing the Houston/Galveston Urban Forestry Council in 1988 and is an active member of the State and National Urban Forestry Councils. Her hands-on involvement has led her peers to select her as chairman of the Alliance for Community Trees, a newly formed coalition of nonprofit groups that will promote tree planting and care through citizen action and public education.

PROFESSIONAL MEDAL

PRESTON D. COLE

Preston Cole has worked his way from the Missouri Department of Conservation to parks superintendent for the city of St. Louis, and now to the Milwaukee Bureau of Forestry. Throughout that time, he has effectively spanned the boundary between government agencies and nonprofit organizations and broken cultural barriers to help the urban forest movement focus attention on people of color in the inner cities.

The first black forester to graduate from the University of Missouri, he served on the local committee of the Fourth National Urban Forest Conference, and in 1991 organized a roundtable discussion on "the cultural dimensions of urban forests" for the Fifth National Urban Forest Conference. He now represents city government concerns on the National Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Council, which advises the Secretary of Agriculture and members of Congress on urban forestry funding.

RESEARCH MEDAL

E. GREGORY MCPHERSON

As an associate professor at the University of Arizona, and now as an urban forest researcher with the U.S. Forest Service in Chicago, Dr. Greg McPherson has had a tremendous influence on our collective understanding of urban forest ecology and the values trees bring to our lives. He holds a master of landscape architecture from Utah State University, a Ph.D in urban forestry from the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry at Syracuse, and has over a decade of service to the National Urban Forest Council and the urban forestry movement. His research into the energy and water conservation benefits of trees has been published in professional journals, the trade press, and newspapers around the world. His award-winning textbook, Energy Conserving Site Design, was published in 1984. Today he serves as lead scientist for the Chicago Urban Forest Climate Study.

THE GIONO AWARD

THE GLOBAL RELEAF JEAN GIONO AWARD IS PRESENTED ANNUALLY TO A CITIZEN WHOSE EFFORTS ON BEHALF OF TREE PLANTING AND THE ENVIRONMENT BEST EXEMPLIFY THE EXTRAORDINARY GENEROSITY OF SPIRIT OF ELZEARD BOUFFIER; THE INSPIRING CHARACTER IN FRENCH NOVELIST JEAN GIONO'S 1954 STORY, "THE MAN WHO PLANTED TREES." THE AWARD WAS CREATED IN 1990 BY AMERICAN FORESTS AND CHELSEA GREEN PUBLISHING COMPANY OF VERMONT, WHICH PUBLISHES U.S. EDITIONS OF THE GIONO STORY. THE AWARD CARRIES A STIPEND OF $1,000.

ALFRED RAFFO

Alfred Raffo's love of trees was instilled in him by his mother, an Italian immigrant who lived on a farm where she learned to care for the land. Unlike his mother, Raffo grew up in Brooklyn, New York, where trees were rare and "land" meant streets and sidewalks. As a youth, Alfred planted trees and belonged to the neighborhood greening association, coming to understand the community benefits of tree planting long before those benefits were fully realized.

In 1976, Raffo formed the Seventh Avenue/Windsor Place Community Association, which began with 53 families, 70 percent Hispanic, 15 percent Italian. The group's tree-planting work gives young people a chance to give back to the community after receiving assistance in job placement, counseling, and other services that the Association provides.

Planting trees, Alfred says, is the second best way to bring communities together; religion is the first. "Planting trees makes people talk to one another," he says, "and it calms them down."

THE GEO AWARD

THE GEO AWARD FOR ENVIRONMENTAL EXCELLENCE, GIVEN THIS YEAR FOR THE FIRST TIME, IS PRESENTED TO THE NONPROFIT, VOLUNTEER-BASED TREE-PLANTING ORGANIZATION THAT HAS SET THE STANDARD OF EXCELLENCE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICE. IT IS PRESENTED BY THE CHEVROLET/GEO MOTOR DIVISION OF GENERAL MOTORS IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE U.S. FOREST SERVICE AND AMERICAN FORESTS. THE AWARD CARRIES A $5,000 GRANT FROM THE GEO ENVIRONMENTAL/TREE PROGRAM.

TREES FOREVER

A program of the Iowa Natural Heritage Foundation, Trees Forever is the largest statewide, nonprofit, privately funded tree-planting program in the nation. Its 6,000 active volunteers, supported by a staff of 11 professionals, work in over 250 Iowa communities, planting between $1,000 and $50,000 worth of nursery-size trees annually.

The emphasis is on action and education, and funding is provided by major sponsors, primarily investor-owned or municipal utility companies.

In addition to community work, Trees Forever organizes rural reforestation projects, promotes youth involvement in reforestation, and serves as coordinator for the Iowa Urban and Community Forestry Council.
COPYRIGHT 1993 American Forests
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1993, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

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Publication:American Forests
Date:Jan 1, 1993
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