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1988's new roses: how do they stack up?

1988's new roses: How do they stack up?

Deciding which roses to grow is always a challenge, since there are so many outstanding varieties to choose from. And this year 10 new roses, including 3 All-America Selections, join the ranks. How do the newcomers stack up against old tried-and-true favorites?

We asked rose experts to name their all-time favorites of the same color and type as the new introductions. Their eight nominations (in italics), as well as the 10 roses introduced this year (capital letters), are listed together in the chart below. The new roses are promising; the tried-and-true ones have been proven.

Reading the chart

In the listing, HT means hybrid tea: large blooms borne singly on long stems. FL means floribunda: less formal, usually smaller flowers in clusters. GR means grandiflora: usually large plants, slightly smaller flowers than hybrid teas, and often in clusters.

Fragrance is rated from one star (light) to three (strong). Cutting refers to the suitability of the blooms for display in vases; three stars means they're long-stemmed, one means short. Under the resist disease heading, the more stars, the better the plant resists mildew, rust, and black spot.

It's time to go shopping

In the West's mild climates, now is the best time to shop for and plant a rose; bare-root plants are still plentiful, and you'll get the widest selection of the year. (In cold-winter regions, March to May is rose-buying season.) One good reason to have at least one rose: no other plant gives as many flowers over a longer period.

The effect of climate on rose performance is often dramatic. Your local rose society can help you find roses that do especially well in your area. For help finding the nearest chapter, ask at a nursery or public rose garden. Or write to the American Rose Society, Box 30000, Shreveport, La. 71130.

To gain the All-America designation, the 1988 AARS selections had to perform well for four years in test gardens in different climates--from Seattle to Denver and Los Angeles to Phoenix--growing alongside other new hybrids.

More good roses, including mauves and whites--22 to choose from

These varieties also received many votes.

Red: "Chrysler Imperial', "Mr. Lincoln', "Showbiz'.

Red blends: "Granada', "Love', "Mon Cheri'.

Pink: "Miss All-American Beauty', "Royal Highness', "Sheer Bliss', "Touch of Class'.

Orange: "Brandy', "Sunfire', "Trumpeter'.

Yellow: "Gold Medal', "Lanvin', "Peace'.

White: "Iceberg', "Pristine'.

Mauve: "Angel Face', "Lady X', "Lagerfeld', "Paradise'.

Table:

Photo: Ideal for cutting, "Prima Donna' is a greenhouse rose you can grow in home gardens. Its long-stemmed flowers can last two weeks indoors
COPYRIGHT 1988 Sunset Publishing Corp.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1988 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

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Publication:Sunset
Date:Feb 1, 1988
Words:428
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