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'FAA'S SECRET LIST -- IT WON'T SAY WHICH FOREIGN AIRLINES IT BANS,' REPORTS MAGAZINE ARTICLE

 NEW YORK, Oct. 7 /PRNewswire/ -- The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has banned 34 foreign airlines from flying into the United States because it has found that their 16 home countries have unacceptable standards of air safety.
 But even though the agency has alerted two congressional groups, it refuses to divulge the bulk of its findings to the public, according to a story in Conde Nast Traveler.
 "The FAA's Secret List: It Won't Say Which Foreign Airlines It Bans," by Gary Stoller, is published in the October issue of the monthly magazine, on newsstands until Monday, Oct. 25.
 Stoller reports that, so far, 27 countries have been investigated by the FAA, 16 of which it concluded do not meet the standards of the International Civil Aviation Organization, and some of which have no effective safety controls at all.
 The agency's study of foreign aviation standards was triggered in 1990 when an Avianca airliner crash on Long Island, fatal to 73, was found to involve a variety of safety violations.
 Subsequently, Air Belize, Regal Air from Antigua, and Nicaragua's Central America Air Lines were banned from flying into the United States. And the FAA says that in the future it will bar other airlines applying for first-time permits if they are from countries with deficient safety standards.
 Neither the FAA nor the bodies it has reported to -- the House Subcommittee on Investigation and Oversight and the General Accounting Office -- will disclose the 13 other countries with unsatisfactory standards, despite the fact that thousands of Americans fly on these airlines while abroad.
 Conde Nast Traveler magazine has learned that of the 13 countries, two are in South America, two in Africa, and one in the Pacific. Several others are in Central America and the Caribbean, including the Dominican Republic, whose own government, following an FAA investigation has banned 10 of its airlines from flying into the United States.
 The man who supervised the probe of foreign countries' air safety, Anthony Broderick, FAA associate administrator for regulation and certification, refused to be interviewed by the monthly travel magazine.
 The publication talked, instead, to James Kenney, manager of the FAA's International Programs Office. "We found one country that doesn't have an aviation inspection staff, and in some countries, aircraft were not being looked at at all," he said. The FAA also found that once they have been licensed, pilots in some countries receive no follow-up training. (In the United States, pilots must retrain every six months.)
 The three-page article details reasons why the FAA will not make its findings public, and why a number of aviation-safety experts disagree. In addition, the news story discusses how the FAA's decision to withhold information may open the door to lawsuits filed against the U.S. government by air crash survivors; why a number of foreign carriers have worse fatal accident records than U.S. airlines (as first revealed by a Conde Nast Traveler study, released in 1990); how a number of FAA documents obtained by Conde Nast Traveler point to disturbing safety breaches at some foreign airlines; and how the FAA contends that it has now increased its vigilance of all foreign airlines flying into the United States.
 -0- 10/7/93
 /NOTE TO EDITORS: For a complete copy of the article or magazine, or to schedule a press interview with Gary Stoller, investigative editor, call the contact below./
 /CONTACT: Susan Soriano, publicity manager of Conde Nast Traveler, 212-880-2579 or 212-880-2102/


CO: Federal Aviation Administration ST: IN: LEI AIR SU:

TW-OS -- NY043 -- 9772 10/07/93 12:40 EDT
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Date:Oct 7, 1993
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